Senator Paul Sanford: “To Heck with Sausage, Laws should be made like Barbeque”

We have all heard the saying “Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see them being made,” which is widely attributed to Otto von Bismarck, a German Prussian politician (1815-1898). A little research indicates that there is some controversy over its actual origin.

A competing theory indicates that the phrase actually originated in the United States from an unknown member of the Illinois legislature in the 1870’s who is reported as stating…”I have come to the conclusion that the making of laws is like the making of sausages- the less you know about the process the more you respect the result.”

porkRegardless of the origin, perhaps a better analogy for lawmaking can be drawn from the making of good southern style barbeque.

Tasty barbeque is derived from slowly cooking pork until it literally falls apart. In the same manner, good laws require the slow test of time and need to be pulled apart to the point that all potential inadvertent consequences can be evaluated.

Who better to guide the lawmaking process than the only master barbeque chef in the Alabama legislature?

sanford2Senator Paul Sanford (R-Huntsville) was born in 1967, graduated from Huntsville High School and the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. He was first elected to the Alabama Senate’s District 7 in a special election in 2009 to determine the replacement for Parker Griffith who resigned after being elected to Congress. He was re-elected in 2010 and again in 2014.

He is the great-grandson of “Big Bob” Gibson the famous barbeque pioneer from Decatur. Big Bob Gibson Barbeque is nationally known for its award winning white sauce and barbeque. Four generations of Gibson’s have now carried on the family tradition. Sanford’s grandparents moved to Huntsville from Decatur and brought with them the well-known name and recipes.

littlepaulsUpon his return to Huntsville after Culinary school, Sanford desired to carry on the family business but also wanted to chart his own course. He stayed in the barbeque business but founded Little Paul’s Barbeque to distinguish himself from his roots.

 

Distinguishing himself from others has become his trademark in the Alabama Senate as well. Considered somewhat of a maverick, Sanford has developed a reputation for not necessarily going along with the crowd. “Sometimes ‘no” is the best vote that I cast,” says Sanford.

He approaches every piece of proposed legislation from the standpoint of his strict adherence to constitutional principles. “I believe that our founding fathers intended for government to be limited, so I am going to be opposed to growing government…both in size and services. I am also going to make sure that the money we send to Montgomery is used wisely.”

The recently concluded 2015 General Session of the Alabama Legislature proved to be particularly irritating to Senator Sanford. He does not necessarily agree that there is a “short fall” in the General Fund. “We don’t have a revenue problem, we have a spending problem.”

The revenues available for the FY16 General Fund Appropriation are $200 million less than the amount appropriated for FY15. However, that’s primarily because the legislature no longer has the $145 million per year that was created by taking money from the corpus of the Alabama Trust Fund.

“I was opposed to taking that money when that legislation passed, and just because we no longer have access to it, I certainly don’t think we need to be raising taxes to cover the difference. We should have made some hard decisions then, but that did not occur and the can was kicked down the road.”

“There are lots of alternatives to reducing the size of government. I can’t believe we didn’t pass the bill to remove the ABC Board from retail sales. Who in their right mind would even think about putting Government into the liquor business today? That was $20 million right there. I just don’t think our guys are ready to take on all the lobbyists and former legislators yet. Ironically, some would rather raise taxes than irritate the government sector. Is that really what Conservative Principles and the Republican Party are about today?”

In this past session, he introduced legislation that would have combined all tax revenues into one pot and then redistributed the proceeds on a percentage basis to education and general fund needs. This distribution plan would have kept education appropriations at their current levels but would have proportionally split the “growth” of the tax revenue for future years. Currently, education gets the benefit of the state’s “growth” taxes.

His frustration with his colleagues is evident. “My bill did not get the consideration it deserved. It was killed in committee without any legitimate debate. I have serious doubts that, when the Governor calls a special session, we will take up anything that could be considered controversial, unless of course it is to extract more tax dollars from the Alabama economy.”

“I know one thing…if they try to just pass some targeted taxes, I am going to do everything I can to stop it. We don’t need more taxes; we need more flexibility to do what we are supposed to do as legislators. We need to prioritize the spending, but right now our hands are tied with all the earmarks.”

pork2Perhaps, like good barbeque, some ideas just take some time to be evaluated until they are ready to be served.

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